A Darrieus type vertical axis wind turbine (the egg-beater type) can in theory work almost as good as a horizontal axis turbine. Actual measurement of one of the better designs out there, the UGE VisionAir5, does not bear that out though: It measures in at a pitiful 11% efficiency at 11 m/s wind speed, while a Bergey Excel-6 HAWT clocks in at 22% efficiency for that same wind speed, twice as much. You can read about it in Paul Gipe’s article.  Besides efficiency issues, a Darrieus VAWT unfortunately has a number of inherent issues that put them at a disadvantage: Since they are usually tall and relatively narrow structures the bending forces on their main bearing (at the bottom) are very large. There are similar issues with the forces on the blades. This means that to make a reliable vertical axis turbine takes more material, and more expensive materials, in comparison to a horizontal type turbine. For comparison, that same UGE VisionAir5 weighs 756 kg vs. the Bergey Excel-6 at 350 kg. Keep in mind that the UGE turbine only sweeps about half the area of the Bergey, the latter is a much larger turbine! This makes VAWTs inherently more expensive, or less reliable, or both.
Kits (3) Wind Turbine Products (91)    - Wind Turbines (14)    - Primus Wind Turbines (2)    - SkyMAX Wind™ Turbines (1)    - Wind Turbine Blades (16)    - Wind Turbine Hubs & Hub Adapters (7)    - Wind Turbine PMAs & PMGs (20)    - Wind Turbine Tails (2)    - Brake Switches (5)    - Diversion Dump Load Resistors (8)    - Wind Turbine Hardware (18) Hydro Products (6)    - Freedom & Freedom II Hydroelectric PMGs (2)    - Hydro Parts & Accessories (4) Solar Products (71)    - Solar Panels (9)    - Solar Panel Kits (3)    - Solar Charge Controllers (35)    - Solar Panel Mounting (23) Charge Controllers (79)    - Wind Turbine Charge Controllers (1)    - MidNite Classic MPPT Charge Controllers (13)    - Solar Charge Controllers (35)    - Wind & Solar Hybrid Charge Controllers (34)    - SkyMAX Wind Hybrid Charge Controllers (1) Power Without Batteries (3) Power Inverters (134)    - Micro Inverters (4)    - Transfer Switches (1)    - UL Certified DC to AC Power Inverters (12)    - Grid Tie Feed Inverters (28)    - Low Frequency Inverter Chargers (41)    - Modified Sine Power Inverters (28)    - Pure Sine Wave Inverters (24)    - Inverter Cables (16)    - 220 Volt 50 Hz Inverters (2)    - Power Inverter Remotes (7) Cable & Electrical Components (130)    - Disconnect Switches (4)    - Steel Enclosures (3)    - Cable, Terminals, & Connectors (69)    - Fuses & Breakers (23)    - Surge Protection (2)    - 3 Phase Rectifiers (9)    - Blocking Diodes (7) Renewable Energy Appliances (16)    - Solar DC Powered Chest Freezers (7)    - DC Ceiling Fans (1)    - LED Lights (2)    - Other (6) DC and AC Meters (23)    - Amp Meters (12)    - Volt Meters (9)    - Watt Meters (2) DC Water Heater Elements (6) Pond Aeration (26)    - Aeration Kits (10)    - Air Pumps (7)    - Hoses & Accessories (10) DC to DC Step Down Converters (7) Batteries (29)    - Flooded Lead Acid Batteries (5)    - Lithium Ion Batteries (2)    - Sealed AGM Batteries (4)    - Battery Accessories (11)    - Battery Desulfators and Chargers (7)
So does it make a difference what type of electrical generator we can use to produce wind power. The simple answer is both Yes and No, as it all depends upon the type of system and application you want. The low voltage DC output from a generator or older style dynamo can be used to charge batteries while the higher AC sinusoidal output from an alternator can be connected directly to the local grid.
Green Energy Corp’s GreenBus® software interoperability platform enables the adoption of evolving Smart Grid technologies and integration with legacy power and communications infrastructures. Microgrid developers can now design and implement an architecture that supports advanced technology adoption over time, while realizing the business benefits incrementally.

There are numerous organizations within the academic, federal, and commercial sectors conducting large scale advanced research in the field of sustainable energy. This research spans several areas of focus across the sustainable energy spectrum. Most of the research is targeted at improving efficiency and increasing overall energy yields.[94] Multiple federally supported research organizations have focused on sustainable energy in recent years. Two of the most prominent of these labs are Sandia National Laboratories and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), both of which are funded by the United States Department of Energy and supported by various corporate partners.[95] Sandia has a total budget of $2.4 billion [96] while NREL has a budget of $375 million.[97]


In 2007, the US Congress directed the Department of Energy to report on ways to reduce water consumption by CSP. The subsequent report noted that dry cooling technology was available that, although more expensive to build and operate, could reduce water consumption by CSP by 91 to 95 percent. A hybrid wet/dry cooling system could reduce water consumption by 32 to 58 percent.[138] A 2015 report by NREL noted that of the 24 operating CSP power plants in the US, 4 used dry cooling systems. The four dry-cooled systems were the three power plants at the Ivanpah Solar Power Facility near Barstow, California, and the Genesis Solar Energy Project in Riverside County, California. Of 15 CSP projects under construction or development in the US as of March 2015, 6 were wet systems, 7 were dry systems, 1 hybrid, and 1 unspecified.
Within emerging economies, Brazil comes second to China in terms of clean energy investments. Supported by strong energy policies, Brazil has one of the world’s highest biomass and small-hydro power capacities and is poised for significant growth in wind energy investment. The cumulative investment potential in Brazil from 2010 to 2020 is projected as $67 billion.[155]

This solar resource map provides a summary of the estimated solar energy available for power generation and other energy applications. It represents the average daily/yearly sum of electricity production from a 1 kW-peak grid-connected solar PV power plant covering the period from 1994/1999/2007 (depending on the geographical region) to 2015. Source: Global Solar Atlas]
×